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20121001
20121009
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CSPAN2 12
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CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 12:00pm EDT
d date will focus on foreign policy. earlier this week the carnegie endowment for peace posted a discussion on the president's role in leading foreign policy. they talked about challenges facing the u.s. including american influence and engagement globally, the changing international order and emerging nations. two of the featured panelists included thomas friedman, "new york times" foreign affairs columnist and author of "the world is flat." and jessica mathews, carnegie president and director of national security office of global issues. >> good evening. my name is david rothkopf, and i will be the moderator for this evening. in the carnegie endowment discussion about how should the next american president engage the world. this is a debate format discussion. we have a terrific group of panelists here. starting on the far right we have professor john ikenberry of princeton. next is tom friedman of the new york times. next to him is our own jessica matthews of the carnegie endowment, and beside jessica is bob kagan at the brookings institution and we are going to cover several
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 9:00am EDT
to say that a rule of foreign policy that i like to follow that i believe should be followed is getting your objective straight before you start haggling about the details. we had no choice. now every generation since then was a great reform and i cannot think of another country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years depended on one man. i actually met no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move them into the international system and engage in reform and institute a market system. the next leader came into office in the aftermath of tien an -- tiennanman restoring china to the international system and making china part of the globalist system. hu jintao is the first leader bachelet to operate a china expert of a globalist system. with each generation, the style of leadership has become less personal. that is mao was treated reverentially almost as a deity. the appointments were never scheduled because of his health but he was suddenly called out of the meeting and taken to mao without advanced warning and without it ever
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 9:00am EDT
of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >> see you later. >> so you can extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that might be instructive. he isn't a manager. he is not come he doesn't have a history of managing things, so you bring in a lot of good well-trained smart people, given the tasks and you try to lead a government. and in the case of governor romney, who has been a governor, who is a business guy, he's run the olympics. i think his attitud
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 5:00pm EDT
for foreign policy analysis. i wonder if the new leadership in china and the relatively new leadership in north korea provide us with opportunities whether we can create opportunities for the cooperation and engagement. >> i think for china that is definitely the case. obviously that is not new leadership either to china or to us. many of those individuals we have known and worked with in the past and they have all indicated not only their willingness to their desire to continue to develop this relationship in a positive way economically, politically, but for us in the defense department and in the security cents. in the north -- north korea we will have to see. we have remained very concerned about so many dimensions, and that is one of the reasons why we are so intent upon solidifying our posture, and that's the reason why we are looking at a number of steps in korea but i'm sure you are familiar with but i will remind you of what is going on. there we are making our presence, particularly the ground force presence putting it on a more permanent basis and more solid basis. that is wh
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 9:00am EDT
themselves in foreign policy, because they are not yet in office. but there have been instances where people, where he felt, china was being criticized, and he made a very sharp response. i've had several conversations with xi and i found him an extraordinary thoughtful person who raised a number of philosophical questions. the problem they face is, if you look at their own agenda, the things they have stated, they want to do for the next 10 years, you know china will have to go to change it. i think it's unlikely in 10 years the next generation will come into office with exactly the same institutions that exist today. and precisely because everybody knows in china there is a kind of political evolution being discussed every day. this is one reason why i do not believe that great foreign adventures or confrontations with the united states can be gone their agenda. they know that domestic changes, in the sense of moving part of the population, overcoming the country in which the coast is highly developed and the interior quite undeveloped, in terms of you cannot keep a society -- [inaudible]
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
. eisenhower also was even-handed in its approach to his foreign-policy. when britain and france and israel invaded, took the suez canal our two oldest allies, our youngest allies general eisenhower insisted that they withdraw and he not only insisted that he organized or the secretary of secretary of the treasury a round, a run on the british pound which left the british with no alternative but to withdraw. domestically eisenhower's progressive conservative. he believed largely in a balanced budget and he was against deficit spending but he also believed the government had a positive role to play. the interstate highway system, which eisenhower -- which was eisenhower's brainchild. [applause] more money was spent on the intraday -- interstate highway system than the new deal from 1839 to 18 to 41 with zero impact on the budget because it was paid for through gasoline taxes. [applause] thethe st. lawrence seaway connecting the great lakes, opening the great lakes to traffic again had been on the drawing board since the administration of theodore roosevelt and eisenhower -- eisenhower took,
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
for calling on me. eric mcsaiden, institute for foreign be policy analysis. i wonder if the new leadership in china and the relatively new leadership in north korea provide us with some opportunities, whether we can create opportunities for further cooperation and engagement. >> well, i think for china that is definitely the case. obviously, that's not new leadership either to china or to us. many of those individuals we've known, we've worked with in the past, and they've all indicated their, not only their willingness, but their desire to continue to develop this relationship in a positive way. economically, politically, but for us in the defense department, in a security sense. in north korea we'll have to see. we remain concerned about so many dimensions of north korea, and that's one of the reasons why we're so intent upon solidifying our posture there. and, um, that's the reason why we're looking at, um, a number of steps in korea that i'm sure you're familiar with, but i'll just remind you of what's going on there. we are making our presence there, particularly our ground force pres
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 9:00am EDT
debate is october 22 from lynn university in florida, and the questions turn to foreign policy. live on c-span, c-span radio, and also online at c-span.org. up next, a discussion on the health care law presidential candidate mitt romney signed into law in 2006 when he was governor of massachusetts from this morning's "washington journal." >> host: a reporter of the "boston herald" talking about the health care bill mitt romney signed in 2006. thank you for joining us. >> guest: good morning. >> host: give us the basics, first of all, back in time to the debate happening in massachusetts. what was governor romney's role in getting the health care law pushed and signed? was he the one who initiated the process? >> guest: it was a massive bipartisan effort, involved politicians, business leaders, small business owners, but he was the governor at the time, and he was the one who effectively signed it into law, and as a backdrop, which probably everybody here knows pretty well, we, as a nation, are dealing with ever increasing health care costs, and as the health care costs go up, we're also d
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
power with regard to foreign policy, military policy. but let me say that my primary interest in the book and in my remarks this evening is much more domestic policy, and can the extent to which elections do or do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic public policy. for the older members in this audience, there has been at least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago. when all of the stars were aligned not only to create a landslide victory for president lyndon johnson -- after all, richard nixon got a landslide victory in 1972 -- but a landslide democratic majorities in the house and senate, and let us not forget a supreme court of the united states that was still thoroughly under the control of liberal democrats. for two brief, shining years or, perhaps, baleful years if you don't like the great society, but for two years for better or for worse, the united states had a goth in the way -- had a government in the way that we often speak of her majesty, say, having a government. that is, a group of peopl
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 8:30am EDT
generations. it's become a national security issue and a foreign policy issue. what specific steps do you propose the united states take to get out of debt or at least make our interest payment issue to live with? berkley: all right, look, we have to get our debt under control, and wasteful spending. and this is the way we do it. the first thing we do is stop giving tax breaks to corporations that are shipping our jobs overseas. my opponent voted five times for the. we've got to stop giving big oil tax subsidy. they don't need. the big guys don't need. people of the state of nevada need to help, the wall street, not wall street corporations. and then after we do that we can make nevada and this country for clean energy jobs capital of the world so we can be generating good paying jobs. you want to get down our debt? let's get people back to work so they're paying taxes. and another thing we can do when it comes to our debt is to pass a balanced budget amendment. and let me tell you what that does. i want to pass a balanced budget amendment but i'm not going to pass an amendment, i'm not g
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm EDT
beyond rhetoric and extend to their thinking about domestic and foreign policy which is what we are talking about this morning. next is a call from janice in louisiana. a democrat. good morning. >> caller: hello. yes, i would like the government to [inaudible] >> host: janice, are you still there? we lost her. apologies. let's move on to gary in eaton ohio. independent. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i think -- i feel that the constitution is there to tell the government what they are supposed to do. and like the guy that brought up water, the epa puts fluoride, they tell you have to have so much fluoride in water. there's something that it's in rat poison and that is why they're having to put so much of it in the water. now they've done a good job training at to water, but the deal is we don't get the news. the news is blocked. just like i ran that thing, the spring in iraq and iran and libya and everywhere that wasn't caused by a movie. it's all blow back and they are lying to the american people about. we can't get the news that we need to be donald man. i've got noth
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 5:00pm EDT
configuration may not be understood. or the risk of leaked intellectual property to foreign businesses and governments. when it comes to articulating the failure of policy on the subject, particularly as a relate its to cyberspace. one look no further than the panel that is here with me today to give you a sense of the potential devastating consequencingses. the second key feature is linked to the one i described is the the increasingly many of the segments vital to defense are commercial in nature. this is a threand department the is frankly more willing to recognize in policy than in practice. i would hasrd a to guess 25 years ago, nearly 70% of the defense the department procured were developmented and produced for the develop. today, i would suggest that the ratio has reversed with roughly 70 percent of the goods and services now either produced for commercial consumption or originally developed with commercial applications in mind as well as a largely commercial base supply chain. this is a very difficult concept for many in our business to get they're their arms around. frankly t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12